Tuesday, 17 February 2015

Dreaming of a pawn revolution

The feeling of despair that follows private contemplation of the world’s condition and apparent trajectory is not something new to me. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t wake up each morning in a fog of gloom – I consider myself inherently lucky and fortunate and about as free as a human being can be. What does get me upset from time to time is the view that we appear to be heading toward peak corruption, a situation where Governments and their corporate puppet masters control every aspect of our lives and listen into and watch every move we make.

Again, this sense of profound dread and paranoia is not foreign to me. Anyone with intelligence greater than an almond should be aware that, particularly since the latter part of 2001, passing legislation that curtails an individual’s right to privacy and free speech has become both easy and commonplace.

Because terrorism. 

Politicians think they can justify outrageous acts of torture, murder, imprisonment without trial, invasion of privacy and the denial of human rights – all because of this never-ending, ambiguous, vague and borderless ‘war on terror’.

It is an obvious truth that, as the human race has become more technologically advanced, the tools with which we can be controlled and persecuted have multiplied enormously. I think it’s a fair observation that religion was and is used as a tool to control the masses. But in a  world where faithlessness is growing and the threat of a fiery hell is becoming less of a deterrent, the prospect of being spied on, arrested on ‘suspicion’ and thrown into a gulag in some remote part of nowhere for an indeterminate period is a very effective alternative. I may not believe in a divine creator but I certainly believe in the power of the almighty US Government.

Apart from the compulsion to use an electronic banking system, and all the exposure to risk that involves, in our quest to have easier access to information and to interact with friends, real or imaginary, we have enslaved ourselves in a virtual structure that can ascertain at any point in time, where we are, what we are looking at, who we are communicating with, and to take a guess at what we are thinking. Whether you think you have something to hide is irrelevant when the people spying on you can change the rules or make shit up whenever they feel like it. Contemplate, if you can, a future world where researching the best fertilizer in which to grow your tulips is now reasonable grounds for 'suspicion' - which now makes you a candidate for indefinite detention in a non-disclosed location. Denial is futile and it serves you right for being so clearly a terrorist.

The scenario is probably a poor one, but it doesn't really matter. My point is, that what might be perfectly harmless and innocent now - once they have decided they can move the goalposts and justify it in the name of 'keeping you safe', there is no way of predicting what they will consider unlawful next. 

What triggered this latest bout of introspection was Laura Poitras’ documentary Citizenfour. I watched it a few days ago and I’m still not sure what upsets me more - that the US Government and their allies have gotten away with it for so long or that there are humans who truly believe Edward Snowden is traitorous scum. Sure, we all suspected that our privacy was fast approaching myth status, but now we have proof and we’re calling the messenger a criminal? Someone who risked his life to expose the truth? That blows my mind.
More David Pope here
While it was not elaborated on in the film, I have no doubt my Government has allowed this behaviour to go on within our borders. Snowden implied that the UK Government were among the worst when it came to protecting their peoples’ privacy, however a casual glance at our Government’s behaviour over the last 20+ years would suggest they’re in the same or possibly worse category. 

My country’s leaders did not object when its citizens were locked away in Guantanamo Bay, they currently believe that locking children away in immigration detention centres is perfectly acceptable, they mock our Human Rights Commission and they are hell bent on introducing laws that allow it to spy on our online activity. To have faith in a lying, cheating and morally bankrupt bunch of scumbags would be tantamount to insanity.

I am many things but I am not insane.
not worth the paper it is written on
Whether you believe that whistle blowers like Snowden deserve condemnation and punishment is missing a larger and more important point. We have a growing list of data that indicts the world’s Governments, fairly convincingly, with illegal and immoral activities – so what are we going to do about it? Are we going to get angry or are we going to simply take it and consider it inevitable and for the greater good? Will the mega-rich stand up on Oscars night, award Citizenfour a statue and then return to spending millions on superhero films?

I feel silly saying this, but we don’t need more super humans in tights. We need real people with influence and tenacity to take action - mass action and sustained resistance that cannot be ignored.

Assuming for a minute that we do put down our smart phones for the time it takes to stand up for ourselves, what next? Even if we do succeed in snatching the reigns of our own destiny, how do you dismantle the enormous web of corruption and who do you put in charge to carry it out? I freely admit that I have no clue, but I’m willing to propose that the aftermath should be of lesser importance than the initial uprising.

When despair and melancholy hit me and I have an overwhelming sense of helplessness, it is the land of dreams that I visit. Yes, that’s right – while a courageous leader would rise up and rally support, I meekly retreat into my private consciousness. I am a sad, frozen pawn. While my mind acknowledges the improbability of this world that I retreat into, it is willing to indulge in fantasy, if only to dull the pain and shame of being that powerless pawn.

In my fantasy land there are no global corporations or armies, personal debt is wiped clean, social media and television is dead and authority is given only to those who do not seek it. Obtaining knowledge and truth is seen as more admirable and important than wealth or social status. Success is considered to be achieving true happiness and helping others achieve the same.

While my land may look like a communist hippy commune to some, I think the attributes are less important than the ones that are not present. Greed and bigotry, for example – are they truly in our nature or are they merely the result of the system we have built over centuries that keeps the poor downtrodden and the rich untouchable?

More and more I wonder what a pawn revolution would look like and whether anarchy would follow. And if it did, whether anarchy would be any worse than what we have now. I know it’s extremely optimistic, but I like to think that humans would inherently know what to do once the titles and power had been stripped from those that have abused them.Be nice to each other. Share. Respect other’s privacy and the right to be happy and free. Don’t be a prick.


I would hope that an uprising would be fairly peaceful and bloodless, but considering how firmly those in power hold on to and value that power, that is unlikely. 

While that future reality might be scary and unpredictable, if we leave it much longer, we may never get the chance to find out. It is clear that the financial system is broken. It is clear to me that our political and social systems are dysfunctional and in dire need of a rebuild. The power to attempt a fix is currently in the hands of a minuscule group of insanely wealthy people with very little motivation to change anything and with a long history of fucking things up and making them worse.

They need to hand it over to the 7 billion pawns. Voluntarily or by force - I don't care which.


After calming down and spending time with my kids, I was going to scrap this post. Life certainly seems good when you're with people you love and you're well fed and comfortable.

But then I thought - no, fuck it. That's exactly the kind of apathy that has led us to where we are today. I am just one insignificant pawn, but I will vent my rage if I damn well want to. I don't really care that the spymasters are probably the only ones listening.

11 comments:

  1. Hi, very deep and thought provoking.

    I would like to contribute two simple things. With the recent demise of Tom Uren, recall that he said he wasn't a communist or a socialist but a collectivist. "Mr Uren believed the Australians' survival rate was due to the "collectivist" spirit engendered by Sir Edward "Weary" Dunlop, who commanded his unit." It's an inspring ideal that appeals to me and I think it is still at large in the Australian community.

    The other idea occured to me this morning and it's more in line with the usual gallows humour which helps me get through the day --- Mr.Habbit and friends are not only succeeding in 'turning back the boats' because of their explicit policies and secret practices, but also because they are striving to turn the whole country into a place that no-one would like to migrate to. I can't fathom the impeccable logic that leads them to behave in such a sub-human way --- there is no inspiration to a collectivist spirit there. However it is good to see them all tearing themselves to pieces atm, that cheers me up a little and gives the feeling that a better reality will prevail.

    thanks,
    C.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, C. Interesting comment about collectivist spirit - I certainly hope it continues to thrive because we'd be buggered without it.

      I have a profound hatred for almost all politicians, regardless of breed, but I agree, Tone and co. are a particularly nasty bunch of cnuts.

      Have a good one.

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  2. Oops sorry I first read that as prawns and was expecting to see a recipe or similar ..... that will teach me to put my glasses on !!!!!

    All the best Jan

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    1. Sorry if that sounded flippant - didn't mean i to be.

      Thought provoking read 'Chips' thanks.

      All the best Jan

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    2. No worries, Jan. I did type "prawn" a couple of times out of habit.

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  3. I often feel exactly the same! Thinking Americans look at how our society has declined since the end of WWII and positively DESPAIR. :-( ...Then we listen to the wackos that keep electing the wild-eyed nutcases who are running Washington now -- it really does incline me to belief in CARB Syndrome, whereas i think its author is a wannabe-DrDavis. There have always been corruption and sociopathy in the world, but it seems to much worse now....

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    1. G'day Tess. I look back and read posts like this and think "Jeez, mate, why so glum?" It's not as if I've got a hard life - I just worry a lot about what our future will look like if we don't stop and pay attention to what's being taken away from us.

      Wasn't familiar with CS, had to look it up.

      Have a good one.

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  4. Imagine the world as a big cake. For hundreds maybe thousands of years around 25% of the worlds population had 90% of the cake. Then the downtrodden wanted their share of the cake and are taking it. Which means we have a lot less cake now, and we will have less cake as times moves on. In short the so called rich countries like the US, UK, Australia and much of Europe is f**cked.

    The best years for us were probably from the 1950's to around 2000. From then we have been living in a fantasy world of milk shakes and masturbation. Mostly smoke and mirrors, with the monumental ponzi scheme called fractional banking and fiat money, kidded us we were all becoming upper middle class. I was once worth a million pounds on paper, once being the operative word.

    One of the few pleasures about getting old is I won't be around when it all comes to and end. When I try to warn young people, they think I am mad, to be fair to them, they are probably right. That's another thing about getting old, I don't give a monkeys what people think of me. Bring on the Jim Beam's.

    Kind regards Mad Eddie

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    1. Thanks for your comments, Eddie. Will shout you a Beam if you're ever in this neck of the woods.

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  5. Just visited your blog for the first time since stumbling across your comments on Peter's (Hyperlipid) blog. Have read a few posts and think you're hilarious, in a good way!

    Anyway, I read this post and it made me think of someone who you might be interested in - Martin Armstrong:

    http://www.armstrongeconomics.com/armstrong_economics_blog

    Anyway, take care and I'm sure I'll comment on another of your entertaining and informative posts!

    James

    (59% Fat, 24% protein, 17% carbs)

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    1. Thank you, James. Will take a look at the blog - sounds interesting.

      Cheers.

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