Saturday, 7 November 2015

This will make you smile and possibly gag - mangrove worms

The Australian indigenous peoples are considered to be among the oldest living human cultures - some estimate between 30-60,000 years. Whatever the actual number, we know it has taken only a couple of centuries to put their beautiful culture in danger of disappearing. What is particularly sad is that the average townie's exposure to the aboriginal culture is the token performance at a sporting event or the lost soul on the street, brain rotten with alcohol and a crushed spirit.

I'm not going to spew bullshit here that I know much about the many different tribal groups that inhabit the top end of Australia, the place where I live, but I'm lucky enough to have had a few brief tastes of the aboriginal culture and those experiences exposed the beauty of the people and their profound relationship with their environment. 

Walking through thick mangroves with a long metal wire looking for mud crabs is about the extent of my practical knowledge of traditional hunting, but I am well aware of the presence of the long, flaccid globs of snot that are referred to as mangrove worms

I have no idea of their nutritional value, but I'm guessing, being a mollusc, they're probably fairly high in zinc, copper, vitamin D, selenium and iron. Why else you would put them in your mouth on purpose, I have no idea.

My bullshit out of the way, if you're looking for something other than cute cats to make you smile today, watch this and then look for the other videos online.  



7 comments:

  1. Gag value is a cultural thing. People in a Western Culture eat oysters, snails and such ocean scavengers as lobsters and a fresh water equivalent - crawl fish. I don't feel ready to chew a fresh lond worm myself.
    Such video should be (but it wouldn't be) of a particular interest for the "safe our Mother Earth" crowd - instead of eating soy imitations of meat and various plants,in order to prevent a global warming, they may bread worms using various garbage ...

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  2. yeah, i'd have to start with a small piece and just swallow it, the way i started with oysters. raw oysters don't have much flavor, really ... which is probably why i like the briny ones best. :-) i wonder what those worms do taste like, which one of the guys described as "delicious"...?

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  3. G'day Galina and Tess. Their 'proper' name is Teredo worms or ship worms (because they bore their way into ship timber) and they're commonly likened to oysters in taste. They also have black lip oysters in that region, which taste quite strong, so I s'pose if you like raw oysters they may be OK. Can't imagine the texture being nice though.

    Galina, you make a good point about the Mother Earth people. They tend to get all upset at the traditional way of slaughtering turtle and dugong (which is rather confronting), but anything not cute (like a M-worm), I'm not sure they'd care that they're eaten alive.

    Cheers.

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    1. I remember upsetting a vegan on one occasion. She was telling to me how wonderful it was to eat alive plants and consume their live force (I wondered about the the amount of calories but didn't dare to ask) instead of eating dead flesh of murdered animals. I said that I though that killing own food before eating was the kind thing to do. She got upset, but on another hand , vegans are such delicate creatures, just about anything may cause a raving rage.
      The aboriginal person may claim that he also consumed life force from ship worms, like vegans from plants.

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  4. That's a great fun video. There used to be extensive mangrove swamps like that along the gulf coast here down south, up until about 100 years ago. Now it's mostly flat sandy beaches or plain mud flats. There would have been worms and crabs galore, a very lively food resource.

    It's so boring now that we all eat coal.
    C.

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    1. oh well, the price we pay for keeping the economy afloat.

      Up north, we're making a concerted effort to rip out all the mangroves so that upper middle class can build their houses among the sand flies.

      Cheers.

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  5. Ah yes, I should have written "flat sandy beaches and multistory apartment blocks "

    Progress.

    There were some interesting changes over time before the apartment-era though. After they cleared the swamps there were huge sandy tidal flats. After a series of massive winter storms in the 1920's most of the sand was washed away.


    C.

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